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want to thank the united states congress for allowing me to add my voice to the global chorus of honors for aung san suu kyi and to send along the deep respect of my husband george as well. the transition in burma, or eastern europe, shows that history has a hopeful direction capable of miracles. there is a part of every soul but longs for freedom and any government built on oppression is built on sand. vast historical changes often begin in the single mind, a single heart and a hope that now grows in burma is a tribute. one of the most repressive governments on earth attempted to isolate and silence 1-woman. it must have seemed an easy task. instead of the regime encountered and it immovable object and its legitimacy broke against her character. she became a symbol of courage, perseverance and defiance, a symbol that integrity was still possible in burma and the symbol became an inspiration for activists, monks and millions around the world. when her long isolation ended some of us finally met aung san suu kyi in person and found not a symbol but a woman, of tremendous humor, honesty a
to proceed, which takes days and then they proceed, and that has made the united states congress -- one of the reasons why the united states congress is judged the least productive congress since the year 1947. so, understandably the majority is frustrated with their inability to move legislation. on the other hand, the republicans, the minority in this case, are frustrated by our inability to propose amendments that will be voted on. now there has been a new phenomenon in recent years, the years that senator levin and i have been in the senate, and that is called going up the tree. -- filling up the tree. that means no amendments are allowed. that is what that means keeping no amendments are allowed. then it is an everyday occurrence. almost routinely, with rare exceptions. on one hand, the majority understandably is terribly frustrated because they cannot move legislation. and we, the minority in this case -- we are not always going to be the minority, we know -- are frustrated by the fact we are unable to get amendments and issues that are important to us debated and voted on. so, th
as the united states congress, mentioned several times in the report, needing to be more involved, have not been given the same documents they have been able to see and hear. yes, we have people who were killed. but we have people who survived. we have been unable -- thy have not provided the names to the american people. they have not let the country know what state they come from and we have not been able to engage and talk to these people. >> sean: i know somebody that vispoken to, that spoke to a person who was there, congressman. i understand that you have also had some contact through an intermediary that are telling me -- and i am not sure exactly what they told you -- that we were lied to from the very beginning. >> oh, i think, clearly, we were lied to from the very beginning. we were totally misled. it's only been the whistleblowers that came forward, the brave whistleblowers and started to tell us the truth. it's only the united states congress congress and chairman issa, pushing the administration. otherwise, we wouldn't even have this happening. but these people are out there, pleas
. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. one month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealing with the division of the territories, most often a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line westward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. nabil after this rather lengthy preface i'm going to get to my main topic, y linkedin rejected all meaningful compromise, which meant the territories. but they're must be one thing more. i am going to talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them all of you know his name, abraham lincoln and who he was and what he did. the other two are not so well known, but probably a number of you are familiar with and recline, the great kentucky statesman. probably fewer, william henry seward. 1860, a senior senator from new york state and prior to his nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the country. now, finally i'm ready to start. >> you can watch
on adoptions is part of their revenge for a set of human rights sanctions passed by the united states congress and signed in to law earlier this movement russia is the third most popular country for americans to adopt. over 60,000 of them have happened since the fall of the soviet union but recently very have become a political football. officials point to the cases of 19 children who have died after being adopted by americans. the issue caught fire in 2010 when this boy was put on a plane alone by his adopted mother. the majority of russians support the ban but it's also sparked outrage among many who say this is playing politics with children. the griffins meanwhile are holding out for a miracle. >> you hope that it's not a door shut but just -- that it's just a hurdle, a delay, we simply don't know. >> reporter: abc news. >> and now, maryland's most accurate forecast. >> take a look at it. sunset comes early these days no question. current conditions now at the airport 37 degrees. winds are west at 16, been a gusty day with high wind advisories across the area. we continue to see the wi
i appreciate you all be near. on behalf of my colleagues in the united states congress, i will ask that you all join me in a moment of silence in tribute to ambassador stevens and the united states personnel who were killed in libya at this morning. thank you. since the days of the american revolution, congress has commissioned gold medals as the highest expression of appreciation for distinguished achievements. the first recipient was general george washington in march of 1776. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to arnold palmer of the commonwealth of pennsylvania. those of you who participate in these events regularly may notice the stage is set up a little differently than usual. we thought it would be more fitting to do so on this side of the rotunda and honor some of the presidents of that arnie knew so well. president gerald ford used to say "you know arnie's army." president ronald reagan. and of course president eisenhower who did a lot for the game of golf. the story goes that eisenhower i asked to play the winner of the 1968 masters championship. that turne
by the united states congress. and so i'm sanded by where we stand. >> can i ask you this is with all respect is there a concern that perhaps you're almost bailing at a time when your moderation is needed most? >> i think it is important to have centrist voices in the united states sales in the but given the fact that i have spent 34 years in the united states congress, i thought that in looking over the next six years whether or not it would appreciably change, i didn't think so. i thought it was best to contribute my experience and insiders a voice to match the outsider's frustration and to talk about how it can change and how it used to work i don't see how it changing on the short term, given the partisanship, polarization, putting the political parties first around not the country's interest first, the outside groups that you perpetuate division, i thought i could best contribute that way. i want to make a difference so in is the best way i can contribute p >> senator snow, thank you very much. been an honor, as i say, also troubling to hear. thank you. >> thank you, martin. >>> what goi
that came forward, the brave whistleblowers and started to tell us the truth. it's only the united states congress congress and chairman issa, pushing the administration. otherwise, we wouldn't even have this happening. but these people are out there, please, keep contacting my office. >> sean: yeah. all right. liz, that's the thing here. it seems to me that a couple of hurdles they had in the beginning. 1, they wanted to run out the clock to the election. they were successful. here's the scathing report. we were lied to about the issue of whether or not this was a protest that went awry, that's not true. this had nothing to do with the youtube video, that narrative was told to us for weeks. there was evidence to support t. how were they able to hide this from the american people, up to and including the election and does that become a bigger scandal if they were hiding it for the election? >> i think clearly they were hiding it for the election. i would add to the very significant concerns here the fact that not a single person has been held accountable -- not a single person. we have no
boswell and why i asked him to come to the congress of the united states. he's been a dear and close friend of mine every day he has served. he will remain a dear and close friend of mine until he and i pass from this earth. he is a salt of the earth human being. he is someone that the american people, if they knew personally, would say is the kind of person they wanted representing them in the congress of the united states or frankly in any other body. leonard boswell, thank you. thanking for serving our country so well, so courageously, so ablely, so conscientiously and with so much decency. you have brought a greater degree of civility and understanding to this institution. it is better for your service. god speed. mr. latham: i'd like to recognize the gentleman from iowa, congressman king. mr. king: i thank the gentleman from iowa for leading this discussion and to have an opportunity to say some things about my friend, leonard boswell, across the floor. i reflect a number of things. in 1996 i aspired to run for the iowa senate. i got there just as leonard boswell was elected to
war ii but were denied benefits through their service. so the war -- the united states congress broke its promise it had made to these veterans and for decades to follow, they struggled to secure fair treatment, similar to that afforded to the men who fought alongside them. as chairman of veterans' affairs committee, bob filner was in the middle of this fight. i wish him well as he moves on to a new phase to his service to the people of san diego. jose baca, or joe baca, has been a friend of mine for a long time. school boards and all other elected offices, but since we served together in the california state assembly to the halls of congress, joe was chairman of the congressional hispanic caucus while i was chairman of the congressional asian pacific congressional caucus and we stood together to fight against harmful english-only and anti-immigrant legislation in amendments. we also share a commitment to protecting the rights of native americans. particularly tribal sovereignty. joe has been a good friend. i will miss him regularly on the house floor. perhaps in a couple of years we
in the house of representative, you rose up from povertiet to be a member of the united states congress. why are you so successful and what is it about you? >> i think it comes down to the strong faith and the lord above and a mother who believes that love has to come in the end of the switch. and she loved me. and a metropolitanor who came along in the right time and taught me basic business princeles of creating a profit and not just income it helped me to start my own career. and i would love to tell them hold on and best is yet to come. and best way to get there is by getting government out of the way. in america today we have a spending problem and not addressed that yet. i think that stands as 99 -- in the obstacles of all americans. we are dealing with a slow pace of our economy. ngovernor, i don't know what the rules are on the u.s.. if you can get jim demint and put your senior in -- senator in the head of the line. you get your guy in first and see ifor demint will leave sooner . >> he was with us long with senator graham and i think senator dimint said january 2 happenedis the rez
of welcoming my personal hero, aung san suu kyi, to the congress of the united states, that she would be able to travel abroad without fear of being barred from returning to the country that she loves and served so well. i consider myself very fortunate to have lived to see this day and to know the people of burma, whose dignity and rights aung san suu kyi has sacrificed so much to defend, and will one day be free to live with liberty, justice and hope. it is a testament to the courage of the burmese people and the person they call simply "the lady," that that day is approaching. i have known quite a few brave and inspiring people, but none more so than the woman we honor today. i first met her 15 years ago when she was permitted to leave her house briefly to speak to me in rangoon. i was not prepared for her. she was exquisitely polite and graceful. she spoke softly and calmly, the picture of gentleness and serenity. is this the woman, i asked myself, who has managed somehow to cause so much trouble for the powerful, violent, unlawful men who have managed to rule this country? men who are so
for the unveiling and presentation of the congressional gold medal by members of united states congress. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, mr. arnold palmer. [applause] >> thank you. mr. speaker, members of congress, reverend clergy, ladies and gentlemen. this is not my first time, so bear with me a little bit. i prepare this wonderful occasion, and i thought about what a thrill it was last time i had the opportunity to address congress in these halls. that was in 1990. on the 100th anniversary of the birthday of president and general dwight eisenhower. i was fortunate enough to have had a warm and rewarding french ship -- friendship with the president, and the last of his years were wonderful. we enjoyed a little golf and a lot of fun. it was a great honor to be able to be with him, a great american. he was that. it was a pleasure for me to spend some time with him. i have had some feelings about this distinguished award that members of congress -- in fact, particularly proud of anything that the house and senate agree on. [applause] it is humbling to realize that just six athletes had this award,
that the united states incurs because congress passes bills that incur debts. congress has to raise the debt ceiling and do it without drama. it should be part of the deal, should be done, and you talk about something that causes heart burn among america's businessmen and women, that's the prospect we engage in those kinds of shenanigans again. that's unacceptable. yes, jeff? >> speaking. debt ceiling, does an agreement have to be part of the agreement to divert the fiscal cliff? >> we're not going to negotiate over what is a fundamental responsibility of congress, which is to pay the bills that congress incurred. it should be part of the deal. it should be done. it should be done without drama. we cannot allow our economy to be held hostage again to the whims of an ideological agenda. it's -- we are the united states of america. we are the greatest economy on earth. we pay our bills. we always have. you know, if congress wants to reduce spending, that should be part of the negotiations that go into making decisions about how we spend, you know, the programs we spend money on, and the presid
. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion dealt with the division. it was a proposal to extend a dividing line, west of the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this lengthy preface, i am going to get to my main topic. why lincoln rejected all meaningful compromise with territories. but there must be o
in the united states congress. two additional members will have the honor of providing ohio the privilege to cast 18 electoral college votes in favor of the candidate who won our state's general election. as citizens of this great state, our views, our opinions are valuable, and our 18 electoral college votes helped decide who becomes the president of the united states and who does not. as a citizen of this date, i am so proud to call ohio home, where i join the 11 million other citizens, the citizens from 241 cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states -- presidents william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals
barbara jordan to come the united states congress. but they were not going to move. if any of us -- why don't we send all of the congress to see lincoln. we need a lincolnesque moment. we need a johnson moment. we need to respond to the surge and that surge needs to overcome the procedural hastert posture and actually the speaker needs to be able to lead on this question. what will america do together to answer this question? i'm going to be getting statistics to show us that when we had the assault weapons ban it has been documented that the use of that weapon went down in criminal activities. >> eliot: no question about it. i think you said something hugely important. we're going to send the entire congress and the president to go together to watch the movie "lincoln." we'll get gun control. congresswoman sheila jackson lee, good luck getting the critically important legislation passed. >> thank you for your service and all of the law enforcement officers eliot i will be reaching out to them. they should be sta
of the united states congress were not graced by the presence of daniel ken inouye. danny was elected to the u.s. senate when i was 2 years old. he had been elected to congress a couple years before i was born. he would remain my senator until i left hawaii for college. even though my mother and grandparents took great pride that they had voted for him, i confess that i wasn't paying much attention to the united states senate at the age of 4 or 5 or 6. it wasn't until i was 11 years old that i recall even learning what a u.s. senator was or it registering at least. it was during my summer vacation with my family. my first trip to what those of us in hawaii call the mainland. so we flew over the ocean and with my mother and my grandmother and my sister, who at the time was 2, we traveled around the country. it was a big trip. we went to seattle and we went to disneyland which was most important. we traveled to kansas where my grandmother's family was from and went to chicago and went to yellowstone, and we took greyhound buses most of the time, and we rented cars, and we'd stay at local motels
in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the united states would have. we recorded almost every -- because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another brothers. they acted that way in private and they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice chairman and chairman and vice chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee. day, over a number of decades, single-handedly changed our american defense posture and they did it with skill and patriotism and knowledge of our structure that very few could have. severa
of recommendations. he'll take the recommendations to the united states congress and push for them and then the president took questions from reporters and all they wanted to ask about was the fiscal cliff. i mean give me a break. that's not what the american people really care about. that's not the most important issue of the day. or certainly wasn't of yesterday that's most of what we're talking about this morning. but first, we take time out to get the latest, today's current news update from lisa ferguson out in los angeles. hi lisa. good morning. >> hey, bill. good morning everyone. four state department officials are out in light of a critical report on the handling of the attacks in benghazi. an independent review panel led that investigation and blamed the state department for management failures and a lack of security at the u.s. embassy in benghazi where four americans were killed. a department spokeswoman says security chief eric boswell is among the officials stepping down. the white house has also named
federal officials to do more, along with the president of the united states and congress to act. and, in fact, i joined over 750 other mayors across this country, using social media and the technology that's available to us today to signal a demand to our congress that we really need a plan and a plan and an action to follow that, to ban these assault weapons and to make sure that we do everything we can to create a higher level of safety throughout the country. assault weapons and the types of things that we've seen in the hands of people who are doing evil or can do evil really have no place, in the home or in the schools or in our streets. and, so, with that we ask ourselves what we can do locally. i also want to recognize the three state senators, senator de leon, state senator leland yee and state senator ted gains, all three of which are sponsoring some five different pieces of state legislation aimed at banning assault weapons and munitions, getting higher levels of background checks and registries, and also i think senator gains is attempting to also make sure that those that
the united states congress both in the house and the senate. >> and as you heard from some republicans who are upset that speaker baner would even be willing to talk about new revenue. forget about tax rates and republicans a lot of them don't want to talk about revenue. what do you make of that? >> what i hear is they want spending cuts first. we have done this a couple times before where we give into the democrats. we have rate increases and increased revenue. we never can get to the spending cuts. i think if you are going to get to the magic number, 218, for most of the house republicans they want to see the spending cuts first. >> what about that, debbie? we hear about the president's demands when it comes to tax rates. we have not heard much from the president and from the white house and from democrats at all about where they would be willing to cut. >> well, i would respectfully disagree with that. you can start with an agriculture bill that passed the senate in a very bipartisan way that cannot pass the house. it gets rid of agricultural subsidee which is a good place to start. the
from their war wound determined one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to chinenafment it was quite an experience. senator stevens had flown the first cargo plane in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. and so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us of both parties got more time with mr. had you and with you than almost the president of the united states would have. we were accorded ever courtesy because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another brothers. they served that way in the senate, as chairman and vice chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee. they over a number of decades single hand edly shaped our american defense posture. and they did it with skill and patriotism and structure very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan he was. he was of the old school. not a bad schooled for tod
meaningful gun legislation? >> i am never confident of anything when it comes to the united states congress or i should say overconfident. but i am confident that we're going to fight for it. because we are at a critical turning point. there is a kind of tectonic movement politically. the ground is shifting on this issue of gun violence protection. this president spoke very eloquently about it at the vigil sunday night. and my colleagues actually have been revisiting their past positions. and i'm confident that we are in a different era when it comes to gun violence prevention. and we've got a real chance of banning assault weapons, stopping high-capacity magazines or clips. mental health intervention, all kinds of measures like that one. >> right. but on top of that and when we see the horrific scenes that has happened in your state and those that have been impacted in a rail way, yet we see a response of senator shelby. he doesn't look like he's had a seismic change at all. look at this. >> with senator feinstein reintroducing the assault weapons -- >> i would oppose those kind of things.
states congress as well, and for us not to act, because we all know that this will happen again, and so not to act is to be complicit in the next thing that happens, and it's going to require comprehensive support, and we should include the nra in this discussion and we should include in a discussion the whole idea of the culture. i'm sure blanche can add an awful lot to that coming from arkansas, but clearly in connecticut we're hurting, but as the president said last night, we're inspired by these people there. now, let's take that inspiration and actually do something. the article today in "the washington post," you know, this is -- >> quickly, we've got to move. let me go to the senator. it seems to me the country, i don't want to involve the city mouse/country mouse stuff, i want to figure out what we have in common here. arkansas, every state, once you get out of the state, once you get past philadelphia into reading, pennsylvania, it's the west. you have to go all the way to seattle to get to something like the east coast again. the heartland of america is gun country. it's pro-g
. it was the first day in many of our lives, certainly my own, that the l thats of the united states congress were not graced by the presence of daniel ken inouye. danny was elected to the u.s. senate when i was two years old. he had been elected to congress a couple years before i was born. he would remain my senator until i left hawaii for college. even though my mother and grandparents took great pride that they had voted for him, i confess that i wasn't paying much attention to the united states senate at the age of four or five or six. it wasn't until i was 11 years old that i recall even learning what a u.s. senator was or registering at least. it was during my summer vacation with my family, my first trip to what those of us in hawaii call the mainland, so we flew over the ocean, and with my mother and my grandmother and my sister who at the time was two, we traveled around the country. big trip. we went to seattle and we went to disney land which was most important, and we traveled to kansas where my grandmother's family was from, and went to chicago and went to yellowstone. we took greyho
they can prevent a vote or have previously been able to prevent a vote in the united states congress on the issue. they have no desire to have a vote on a national basis. again, i want to reiterate that i'm not talking about basic weapons or weapons that are used in hunting. to the best of my knowledge, if anyone uses an assault weapon in hunting with a 30-round magazine, i would be quite surprised by that. and, by the way, if they do and because of public safety, that should go away, then i believe that should go away. [ inaudible question ] >> i think gun safety has been important to our administration, and the fact is that we are ranked as having the top five toughest laws on guns in the nation, but i will go back to what i said earlier. absent a federal framework, and i'll actually even drill down further into my own personal history. as mayor of stanford, we came to understand that a good percentage of the handguns that work their way to connecticut work their way up i-95 from states in which there are substantially easier gun laws, and guns in some cases sold under exceptions t
a balanced budget amendment. does that help them? >> yes it does. yes it does. even tte united states congress can't get a budget done. it has been three years in the senate. they can't do it. they should pass a law in the federal government that says they have to have a balanced budget. gerri: look at some of these numbers, national debt per capita, florida looking pretty good here. keep in mind, the federal debt is the 51,900 per person. they set the benchmark. but in florida the number is closer $7,000. get a sense how other states are doing t. the more you drive that number down, the better off the states will be in the pong haul, right? >> correct. gerri: isn't that what we're looking at? >> correct. gerri: pare back the programs that are fat and bloated? >> corrects. a lot of people use the word fair. the president has done that. everybody pay their fair share. who is the person to determine what is fair? it is an arbitrary rule. gerri: you said over and over, and i think it is so interesting. >> why not 260? why not $249,800. or 2 1/2%. they reach up out of the sky and grab a
work in the united states congress. moving forward, i expect the administration will continue to communicate clear and achievable criteria for the formal recognition of this group as the sole, legitimate representative of the syrian people. and once those criteria are met, the u.s. should move quickly to recognize and support -- show support for this group, and continue to repeat the commitment to democratic principles for syrians of all religious and ethnic backgrounds and. time is growing increasingly short for these moderate elements among the political and armed opposition. we see reports of increased influence of foreign fighters and jihadists. the space to positively influence the elements is narrowing and perhaps closing. the establishment of the new opposition group, combined with a better understanding of the armed population, provides a renewed opportunity for a more assertive u.s. policy. let me propose a couple of ideas. number one, first the u.s. must lead an effort to better coordinate international support for the moderate serious opposition. several countries o
it becomes all of our responsibility but certainly in the united states congress to take action and already there's an outpouring for members in my caucus, and i hope that we can reach bipartisan accord on this because there's many in the nra that certainly believe in universal background checks and as was pointed out by dianne feinstein and others, assault weapons, what purpose do they serve, you know, and these automatic clips? mike thompson calls them assault clips. do we really need them? to allow terrorists who could be on the list to get a gun? come on. we ought to make it as easy as someone to get access to mental health as they have to an assault weapon. that's what we can all come together on, and that's what we should be doing. >> congressman, i want to ask you, because you were there with the president. you were on air force one. you were in the room last night. for those of us that have followed his career in the white house closely, it seemed that this was a defining moment of his presidency. it was very clear that this has affected him not just as the commander in chief, but a
looking at the elections and how they can leverage their political positions in the united states congress rather than what's in the interests of this country. in the house of representatives, we've seen this through congressional redistricting, to the point you really have 35 competitive seats based on a story that was disclosed this week in an analysis, that again, underscores how the deep divide has only grown wider because you have very few centrists left, very few competitive seats, and that is also true even in the united states senate. and the political parties want it this way. they want the divide. because then again, they can build on that, they can capitalize on that in the next election. every vote becomes about the next election. it isn't about the country. that's why i think it's going to be critical for the american people to watch very closely in this next session of congress and what congress is doing, whether or not they're in session doing their jobs, in session five days a week holding hearings, but considering legislation on the floor through the amendment process, and
of defense position. again, i don't know what happens there. he does a marvelous job in the united states congress as head of the foreign relations committee. we have all good options for john in my view. john kerry could serve ably in any number of positions. want to say about egypt, i don't know how much time you have, andrea, but some key egyptian national security officials are in washington now explaining egypt's recent actions. again that's a whole -- >> we were going to -- >> big pile of moves. i mean many good, some troubling, hopefully egypt and the people of egypt can find their way through this latest constitutional crisis and there can be a adopted by referendum a constitution that most of the people in egypt fear -- feel is fair. my comment there is sadly, both sides don't do politics very well. they're good at protesting and boycotting and issue decrees, they're not as good and our congress isn't so good at the moment either in working out compromises. after all, if both sides are a little unhappy it's probably the best way forward. >> jane harman, thank you very much. >> th
been one of the great congressmen for years in the united states congress. he's been representing massachusetts since he was elected back in the early '80s. i want to talk to congressman frank tonight. thank you for joining us barney frank. >> thanks for the chance, chris. >> i think you have probably been thinking big about what you have been doing these incredible numbers of years, since the '80s, since the reagan era. can you feel in you or do you sense progress in this country or perhaps decline from the reagan era to the obama era? when you put them all in your head? >> certainly. look, i'll take one very close to me. the question of legal equality for people who are lesbian, gay, bisex you'll or transgender. that fight is about over. it's sort of odd to hear mitt romney complaining that president obama got an advantage because he was for same-sex marriage. not very long ago that was a wedge issue bob dole was using against bill clinton. i think we've made progress in some other areas. clearly be done and we have the deniers of global warming, but we're reducing the amount o
people think and feel, how they vote, but the issues that the united states congress deal with every day. let me give you an example, all right? is deficit reduction a serious issue? it is. i'm in the middle of that debate right now. but you know what is a more serious issue according to the american people? the need to create millions and millions of jobs. now how often are you turning on tv and saying, "hey, we're in the middle of a terrible recession. it is, we have 15% real unemployment or underemployment in america. we've got to create millions of jobs." that's what working people are saying, but the big money interests are saying, "oh, we've got to cut social security. we've got to cut medicare. we've got to cut medicaid." there is no other option. so i give you that just as an example of how corporate media throws out one set of ideas, where the american people are thinking that jobs are probably more important. >> it has probably not escaped your attention that the mantra "fiscal cliff, fiscal cliff, fiscal cliff" is played out every night on the evening news and the corporate ne
that while he has been a member of the united states congress. that really is extraordinary. this is going to be really fun today. let me just give a quick preface. i have been in this town for 43 years. i have never seen anything like the last month. it has just been incredible. people are rallying together. it is galvanizing. it shows you what strong leadership can do. i do not think many people think you can have a strong leader who did not have roots in washington, even more given the history of this town. to have an african-american leading like this is just extraordinary. and i think rg3 deserves incredible credit for everything he has done. [laughter] and now we can talk about the fiscal cliff. let me start off just by -- we will do the house rules, except we will cut in half. 30 seconds -- then we will have time to elaborate on all this. i want to go through the panel. what do think the odds are that some kind of the deal will be cut by january 1 in order to avoid sequestration and all the tax hikes? mark, i will start with you. >> i think it is 80% that we will avoid sequestration
be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. >> well, if you wanted the problem with the uncompromising mine says, look no further than the congress, the 100th of congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets passed. the least of legislation and the last 50 years. why? because everybody is campaigning all the time. there is very little by way of relationships across the aisle. and we went out to the brink of the debt ceiling crisis before. compromise was reached which was routine in the past. so we thought that by focusing on the problem of congress whose popularity is at all-time lows. john mccain said, you can account for that 9 percent popularity of congress during the debt ceiling crisis by blood relatives and paid staffers. we saw it by focusing on congress weekend above the diagnose the problem and give some prescriptions for how to overcome it. >> what is one of those prescriptions? >> well, one of those prescriptions is very simple, which is, congressmen need to exercise mixing mind sets, by putting aside the campaigning mindset long enough t
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